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Center for Global Research Data

Prescriber effects on outcome of psychopharmacological treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD)

Lead Investigator: Robert Schoevers, University of Groningen
Title of Proposal Research: Prescriber effects on outcome of psychopharmacological treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD)
Vivli Data Request: 5974
Funding Source: None
Potential Conflicts of Interest: None

Summary of the Proposed Research:

Treatment outcome is the result of both specific and unspecific factors. In Major depressive disorder (MDD) treatment, the primary specific factor is the ingredient of the antidepressant medication. Unspecific factors include treatment form and setting, as well as characteristics of both patient and doctor/therapist. In placebo-controlled studies, these unspecific factors are controlled for, so that the difference between pill and placebo can be fully ascribed to the medication. To maximize outcome for patients, it is relevant to learn more about the influence of therapist factors, and how they could be strengthened. As of yet, very few studies have done such an analysis. A secondary analysis of an Randomized Controlled Trail (RCT) with imipramine by McKay et al (2006) suggested that these therapist effects could be substantial. However, this was a relatively small study, and these results have not been replicated. Therefore, the current study will investigate the magnitude of the influence of individual therapists on the variance in outcomes of MDD treatment in an independent and larger dataset that contains raw individual-level data from multiple previous RCTs comparing duloxetine and placebo. Importantly, investigation of therapist influence – is the prescriber of the antidepressant medication – on the effects of both antidepressants and placebo is possible in this data, as for all participants in the studies an identification code of the individual prescriber is available (“invglobe”).

Relevance:

If results show relevance of variation in prescriber factors for treatment outcome, this knowledge could be used to improve treatment effectiveness, for example by optimizing certain clinical skills.

Requested Studies:

Duloxetine Versus Placebo in the Treatment of Major Depression
Sponsor: Eli Lilly and Company
Sponsor ID: F1J-MC-HMAQ(A)

Duloxetine Versus Placebo in the Treatment of Major Depression
Sponsor: Eli Lilly and Company
Sponsor ID: F1J-MC-HMAQ(B)

Duloxetine Versus Placebo and Paroxetine in the Acute Treatment of Major Depression
Sponsor: Eli Lilly and Company
Sponsor ID: F1J-MC-HMAT(A)

Duloxetine Versus Placebo and Paroxetine in the Acute Treatment of Major Depression
Sponsor: Eli Lilly and Company
Sponsor ID: F1J-MC-HMAT(B)

Duloxetine Versus Placebo and Paroxetine in the Treatment of Major Depression
Sponsor: Eli Lilly and Company
Sponsor ID: F1J-MC-HMAY(A)

Duloxetine Versus Placebo and Paroxetine in the Treatment of Major Depression
Sponsor: Eli Lilly and Company
Sponsor ID: F1J-MC-HMAY(B)

Duloxetine Once-Daily Dosing Versus Placebo in the Acute Treatment of Major Depression
Sponsor: Eli Lilly and Company
Sponsor ID: F1J-MC-HMBH(A)

Duloxetine Once-Daily Dosing Versus Placebo in the Acute Treatment of Major Depression
Sponsor: Eli Lilly and Company
Sponsor ID: F1J-MC-HMBH(B)

Duloxetine Hydrochloride (LY248686) Protocol F1J-US-HMCB Duloxetine Once-Daily Dosing Versus Placebo in Patients With Major Depression and Pain
Sponsor: Eli Lilly and Company
Study ID: NCT00036335
Sponsor ID: 6353

Duloxetine Versus Escitalopram and Placebo in the Treatment of Patients With Major Depression
Sponsor: Eli Lilly and Company
Study ID: NCT00073411
Sponsor ID: 7978

Duloxetine Versus Placebo in the Long-Term Treatment of Patients With Late-Life Major Depression
Sponsor: Eli Lilly and Company
Study ID: NCT00406848
Sponsor ID: 10815